Category Archives: Projects

Upcoming projects to be done at Stout Grove.

Planing Maple Baseboard

As always, things have been pretty busy over here at Stout Grove. Besides being 37 weeks pregnant right now and trying to finish up as much of our house as we can before the wee one is born, my husband and I have committed to milling up, drying, planing, joining, ripping, sanding and routing all of the baseboard and door and window trim for the new house. Its been incredibly time intensive, but will be worth it in the long run seeing all that beautiful maple in the house – maple that we had to cut down to build the house, which makes it even more cool!

Check out this video of us planing down 1 of the baseboards!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgsTrW98m84

 

Photo Jan 04, 3 41 00 PM Photo Jan 04, 4 18 55 PM Photo Jan 04, 4 19 10 PM

Turning Logs into Lumber – Part II

So, after my last post about stacking saw milled lumber, you should all be experts in the first steps of getting ready to crank up that sawmill and get to work! When my husband and I realized that we would need to cut down a dozen trees where we planned to build our house, a friend mentioned having someone with a sawmill come in and cut them up into lumber for future building endeavors. As this idea started to morph and become its own beast, we suddenly became the proud new owners of a Wood Mizer LT15 sawmill. Why pay someone to do your dirty work when you can slave and sweat over it all summer long yourself? 😉 And so the story began where every spare moment was spent cutting down trees, cleaning up their tops, having huge bonfires, stacking loads of firewood and cutting lumber out of the wide bottom trunks.

The sawmill we own is a hand cranked and manually adjusted model where the log lies stationary on the mill and the human pushes along the gasoline powered ban saw blade, taking off slices of wood one by one, picking them up and moving them to the side. While not extremely hard, it was a loud and dirty process. I got more sawdust in my eyes that summer than I ever hope to get in there for the rest of my life combined. When we first started we also ran into the problem of how to get a round log into a bunch of rectangular pieces with the least amount of waste. On top of that, with a motor running and earmuffs protecting our hearing, it was pretty difficult to discuss with each other the best plan of attack for each log. Eventually we figured out a good system, and learned a new silent language we devised, composed of pointed, head nods and facial expressions.  We were on a roll.

Ready to go. Make sure your mill is on a level surface.

Ready to go. Make sure your mill is on a level surface.

The first thing you need is a plan for what dimension lumber you want cut. Without that already in your brain it makes it the whole process much more difficult. Coming into the process all willy-nilly just doesn’t cut it. Since we were building a barn with all of our wood, we needed wood in all shapes, sizes and lengths. Hmmm, lengths: that brings up another point I forgot to mention before. When you cut the length of your log, it is best to make it at least a foot longer than the lumber you need. For example, if you need 8’ long boards, you should cut your log to at least 9’ in length. This is in case the ends of the boards split while drying. Painting the ends of the logs before milling will also help keep the boards from splitting since rapid moisture loss (the main culprit in board splitting) is stopped with the paint barrier at the end.

Get the most out of your log.

Get the most out of your log.

The single most important tool you will need is a “cant hook”. A cant is the term for your log once the rounded edges are cut off and it is more square in shape. A cant hook is a simple tool with a hinged hook on one end that digs into the log while you use mechanical leverage to help roll the log. It’s pretty amazing and makes you feel super strong when you are able to move a humongous log by yourself.

A simple Cant hook

A simple Cant hook

So right now, you have your drying racks set up, know what dimension lumber you want, have cut the length of your log longer than necessary and have both ends painted, and you have your handy cant hook in hand. You are ready. Using your cant hook and some ramps (or the forks of a tractor if you are that lucky) get your log up and onto the sawmill! Ideally you want to have the narrower end of the log at the beginning of sawmill track; this allows you to have an idea of just how much the logs needs to get whittled down when you start the blade up.

Always wear your ear protection!

Always wear your ear protection!

This is how we went about making our round log into rectangular pieces with the least amount of waste:

The first cut you make should be shallow. Since the log is tapered and wider at the end of the log, starting with a ½” cut could still result in a 4” thick slab at the end, which can be pretty heavy and awkward to move.

Start making your cuts.

Start making your cuts.

After you make the first cut, you need to think: Do you need to make a second cut on this same side again? Remember that ideally you will end up with a square(ish) log with little bark remaining on it. Most likely you will need a second cut. Cut thickness can go in any increment that you want. If you are interested in cutting a bunch of 2” thick boards, then maybe your next cut should be 2” thick. It will take a lot off of your log, but the scrap could be set aside and trimmed into a board in the end.

A second cut to get enough bark off may be a good idea.

A second cut to get enough bark off may be a good idea.

Once you are satisfied with your top cut(s), get out your trusty cant hook and roll the log 90° so that you can trim off another side. Just like before, take a thin slice at first and then decide how much to take on a second cut. Continue this all the way around the log. When you get to the last side, remember what dimension lumber you want in the end.

You got to love leverage!

You got to love leverage!

Make that last cut to get your square cant.

Make that last cut to get your square cant.

Most likely there will be one or two sides of the log which will have more bark on it than the other sides. What size do you want your cant to be before you start taking slices off of it for your boards? Are you cutting 2”X6” boards? Then you should aim for a cant that is 12” in at least 1 of its dimensions since that will allow you to get 2- 6” boards. Are you looking for 1”X5” boards? Aim to have 1 side of your cant 10” so you can get 2- 5” boards out of each slice. Sometimes it is not that easy and you may have to mix and match your dimensions you end up with. Maybe a few 2”X6” boards and some 2”X4” boards if your log is only big enough for a 10” cant and not 12”. Remember to save any worthy trim pieces that could get trimmed into lumber at the end.

Make any last cuts to get your cant the right dimension and get rid of any last bark you don't want. Remember to save these trim pieces for the end!

Make any last cuts to get your cant the right dimension and get rid of any last bark you don’t want. Remember to save these trim pieces for the end!

Perfect 12"X12" cant.

Perfect 12″X12″ cant.

Once you have your cant to the right size, you will want to start double flipping your log after each cut. Since the tree you are cutting has been growing for decades under all sorts of conditions, it is likely that there will be a lot of tension in the heart of the tree. You will be able to notice this tension being released (much more in some logs than others) when you take your slices off and the board bows up. By flipping the log twice after each cut, you are alternating cutting from the top and bottom of the cant, releasing the tension in the log equally from both sides and hopefully cutting down on how much bow you have in your boards. As you cut your slices off each side, set them aside if they need to be cut in half again.

Taking a slice off 1 by 1.

Taking slices off 1 by 1.

Congratulations. You now have a stack of lumber! Do you still need to trim them up a little more to get your desired dimensions? Maybe you wanted a stack of 2”X6” boards but you currently only have 2”X12” boards. Don’t turn that sawmill off quite yet! Bring a few of the 2”X12” boards back over to the sawmill and lay them on their 2” sides stacked next to each other. Clamp them in place and set the sawmill blade at 6”. Now you have a bunch of 2”X6” boards. Remember all of the trim pieces that I told you to save? You can do the same thing with them too. Lay them on their sides and trim off the remaining bark to get usable lumber. Viola!

Lay the slices on their side and cut to the desired width.

Lay the slices on their side and cut to the desired width.

17

Lastly comes my least favorite part: stacking the wood on those beautiful drying racks you already made and covering them with sheet metal and a weight to help them dry straight (I don’t know why but I really dislike stacking the wood. I think it is because when the sawmill gets turned off I think I am done for the day, only to realize there is still more work waiting). Wait a few months for them to dry. You can buy a moisture meter for pretty cheap to see how much water content is still in your boards. 10% is pretty darn good for air dried lumber. Now get to building something!

18 19

*Another thing that we ended up doing was buy an hour meter for our mill. This helps keep track of how long your machine is running which is good for maintenance and resale purposes.

Turning Logs into Lumber – Part I

In past posts I have alluded to a sawmill that my husband and I bought last spring; one which took over our summer last year and resulted in us building a barn in the fall. With the exception of a few small sessions using it to trim up some boards, the sawmill hasn’t really been fired up since this winter when we cut wood for our chicken coop (remember when I wrote a post about how cold days and sawmills don’t work? Funny enough, a week after that post we cut most of the wood for our chicken coop….in the snow). The newest task which my husband and I have taken on is committing to cut all of the window and door trim as well as the baseboard for our house that we should be breaking ground on at the end of this month. Unfortunately, the sawmilling isn’t really the ambitious part of the project. All in all it took us 2 days to cut the 1,500+ linear feet of wood we need. What worries us is that in a few months, once this wood is dry, we need to send it through a planer, joiner and router to make them house-worthy trim. And to make matters even worse, we just realized yesterday that while we are plaining, joining and routering all of this wood, we will most likely be doing it in our barn….and if all goes well, by then we will have sold the house we currently live in and we will be living in the barn. See where I am going with this? Look for future posts discussing the trials and tribulations of that!

Wood, wood and some more wood.

Wood, wood and some more wood.

But really, how does one take a big ol’ log and turn it into usable lumber? The process is not really that difficult. It took us a little bit of time to figure it all out, become efficient and waste the least amount of wood as scraps, but after cutting enough wood for a barn we have gotten pretty good at it. It also took a few attempts to figure out the best method for stacking all the cut lumber; trial and error and re-stacking lots and lots of wood. And while we may not have been rock climbing as much all summer while we were stuck working, we still managed to stay in shape and “farm strong” from lifting so many boards.

Stacking Lumber

We had read many places the proper way to stack lumber: Make a level surface above the ground, place 1 layer of pieces of lumber on the surface with approximately 1” spaces in between the boards, place 1”x1” pieces of wood (AKA Sticker) on top of that layer perpendicular to the lumber to keep airflow, add another layer of lumber, repeat.  We created the stacks by using 6 cinder blocks (1 at each corner, and 2 at the center edges) and laying 2”x6” boards on their side (they are stronger that way) width wise on top of them. Make sure that the 2”x6”s are level, and that they are all the same elevation – these are what the lumber will lay on for the remainder of the time drying. See the illustration below.

Stacking Wood Diagram

What wasn’t specified strongly enough in everything that we read, some of which caused us great difficulties later, were a few things:

1)      Make sure your initial level surface above the ground is a few feet above ground to increase the amount of airflow moving through the pile of lumber from the bottom.

2)      Keep all lengths of lumber on the same stack. Since you will only have 3-4 bottom supports (i.e. the 2”X6” on the cinder blocks), it makes it difficult to put lumber that is shorter or longer than the stack on the pile. If you do, the end(s) of the lumber won’t be supported and will end up drying crooked.

 

Stacked maple. Note the stickers between each layer and evenly spaced.

Stacked maple. Note the stickers between each layer and evenly spaced.


3)      Keep all the same width boards on one stack, or if you really need to mix and match on a single stack of wood (e.g. having both 2”x4” and 2”x6” pieces), stack the same size wood vertically on top of each other. This will keep airflow moving vertically through your pile of wood. Ideally, you want to be able to see down to the ground between each piece of wood you stack. This is major thing that we did not do right and ended up forcing us to re-stack almost all of our wood after we noticed some had some black staining on it because it was not drying quickly enough.

4)      On the same note, keep boards of all the same thickness within the same stack row. The 1”x1” stickers used in between each row of stacked lumber not only help keep horizontal airflow, but they also keep weight from the rows above them on the stacked lumber to help them dry straight.  For example, you don’t want to have 1” thick boards stacked in the same row as 2” thick boards. The stickers will not be able to put any weight on the 1” thick boards and they will most likely warp when they are drying.

Photo Jul 13, 12 28 39 PM

Vertical and horizontal air movement is necessary for quick drying.

Vertical and horizontal air movement is necessary for quick drying.

5)      Have a heavy duty tarp, or better yet, sheet metal on hand to cover the wood. Rain on drying wood will not do it any good! Make sure that you have sufficient overhang on all 4 sides of your lumber stack and keep weight on top of it all to 1) keep the metal on the stack, and 2) to keep the boards from warping while they dry.

6)      Also, having your stacks of wood in a sunny, well ventilated place is good. Our stacks were under trees, but at the edge of the tree line so we still had a lot of good air flow to help dry them out quickly.

Always make sure to keep you wood covered too!

Always make sure to keep you wood covered too!

Once you have all of your drying areas set up it is time to start milling!! Stay tuned for the next post about the art of milling up your lumber.

Making Your Sap Into Syrup and Building Your Own Evaporator

It’s snowing once again. This seems to be the winter that keeps giving. But that isn’t to say that spring isn’t fighting hard to bust through that door and make things green again. Here in Southern West Virginia we have had a handful of really nice days in the 60’s. It’s been enough for us to collect about 130 gallons of maple sap from our 10 trees we tapped earlier in the month; enough that our tree buds are ready to break at any moment and sap production has slowed down dramatically; and enough that we no longer are collecting sap for syrup, but instead hoping we can get enough of the last drips to use for making another batch of our Maple Stout beer that we made this past winter. Yum. All together my husband and I (and a few friends and family along the way) spent 3 weekends boiling and boiling and boiling some more to get those 130 gallons of sap down to a measly 2.5 gallons of syrup. We also spent another 2 nights at home finishing off the syrup on the stovetop in a more controlled setting.

Last spring we used a $40 turkey fryer we bought as a last minute decision as a result of our last minute decision to make syrup. It took FOREVER to boil the sap down. This year we upgraded. After looking at hugely expensive sap evaporators for sale, we went the homemade method. A really great article from Mother Earth News gave us the general idea we needed. A bunch of cinder blocks, a handful of buffet serving trays and some wood (which we have no shortage of at the property) were all we needed. Since we are thinking about making our evaporator a firepit/grill for summer month’s use in our future backyard, we made a temporary one for this year. No firebricks or mortar necessary. We also used an old piece of tin roof laid across the opening and some logs to hold it in place as our door. Nothing too classy, but it worked for this year and there is always room to improve, right?

The Evaporator! A picture is better than any description I can write.

The Evaporator! A picture is better than any description I can write.

When putting our evaporator together, we decided on a location near our barn and next to one of the many stacks of wood we have lying around. We needed to keep the fire going to keep the sap boiling. We leveled out a 3’ long line and places our first level of blocks down and then continued to stack them 3 rows high. The pans we were using were full size, 4” deep stainless steel buffet pans I bought online. They are about 20” X 13”, so we laid the next line of cinder blocks 20” away, parallel to the first blocks so that the pans could fit in between them tightly. The most complicated part was the back and the chimney. The Mother Earth News article doesn’t go into detail about how to make sure your smoke has a way to escape, and how to ensure it is not escaping into your face and boiling sap. At the back side of the evaporator, between the 2 rows of cinder blocks, we placed 2 rows of blocks to create a “U” shape. For the third row of blocks in the back, we left a large gap (about 6”) in the middle between the blocks. This would be the start of our chimney. We then took blocks we broke in half and stacked them on top of the gap, with the cinder block holes facing up. This was 4 stacks high and created the chimney. Finally, more blocks were stacked in the back to block any holes. To help force the hot air and smoke from the fire, up and out of the chimney, we also added another block with a 2” paving stone on top of in the very back of the structure. I am not sure if this is a necessary step, but it worked great for us.

Start the fire!

Start the fire!

Clear sap starting to get hot.

Clear sap starting to get hot.

Once the evaporator was build came the fun! For our first weekend of evaporating, we had collected about 75 gallons of sap the week before. We started the fire up, set the pans in and filled them up! It took a while to get them boiling, but after we had a good bed of coals, we were in business. To help with the process, we did get the ol’ turkey fryer out of storage and use that to heat the sap up before we added it to the pans. The evaporator was so much more efficient than the turkey fryer that by the time the turkey fryer had gotten a batch of sap to boil, the evaporator had already vaporized the previous batch. Awesome!

Starting to get really hot and bubbly - make sure to skim off that foam periodically or it will burn to the side of your pan.

Starting to get really hot and bubbly – make sure to skim off that foam periodically or it will burn to the side of your pan.

Can you tell which pan gets more heat? The dark middle pan was the hot spot, evaporating a lot faster than the other pans.

Can you tell which pan gets more heat? The dark middle pan was the hot spot, evaporating a lot faster than the other pans.

Throughout the day we kept adding more wood and more sap, while slowly watching the liquid in the pans turned from crystal clear to amber. At the end of each day we evaporated the sap down real low in the pans and then poured them all into a container to save for finishing on the stove top at home. After the first 2 weekends we had over 6 gallons of almost-syrup crammed in our fridge. After our first night of finishing some of the syrup on our stove we realized we could/should have reduced the sap a lot more outside. Our whole house was a steamy mess. Moisture was flying through the air, our kitchen walls were dripping with condensation and everything was hard to see through the thick fog in our kitchen. We made sure the next weekend to evaporate it much further down outside before bringing it home.

A lot of steam in a little kitchen - see the moisture running down the wall? This is why most evaporation is done outside...

A lot of steam in a little kitchen – see the moisture running down the wall? This is why most evaporation is done outside…

Last year we were very nervous about how long to boil the sap down. We stopped it much too early for fear of going too far and ruining the whole batch. We ended up with delicious, sweet liquid, but it was way too watery and not packed with the full flavor finished syrup should have. No matter how much you read, or how many people you talk to, it’s hard to know when syrup is done until you see it at least once. I was a nervous wreck the whole time we did our first batch this year. My husband kept insisting, “It’s ok, just wait.” We had even prepared ourselves and bought a refractometer beforehand. This nifty little contraption takes a few drops of your liquid and gives you a Brix reading, which translates into how much sugar is in your liquid. Beer makers use them as well to know how much sugar is in their wort before the yeast eats it all and turns it into delicious alcoholic beer. What made me nervous about the refractometer we bought was that maple syrup has a brix reading of 67 or so and the lowest reading our meter did was 58. We had to get the syrup really close before we would even know if this thing worked! But patience paid off (but only after tasting spoonfuls of syrup all night…I felt a little lightheaded from all the sugar by the end) and we finally got a reading! Our syrup was done! Out of all the hints and tips I read about how to tell if you finally have syrup, none really made sense or worked for me. I will tell you, however, that I noticed once it was really close, when you took the pan off the heat, the syrup still boiled in slow motion. It was so thick that it would not instantly stop boiling like water does once off the heat.

The bubbles from boiling are starting to get really thick...getting close.

The bubbles from boiling are starting to get really thick…getting close.

In the end, we got a little over 300 oz of syrup for the approximate 130 gallons (16,640 oz) of sap we collected. We canned them all in glass jars, turning them upside down so the hot liquid sits on the jar lid to help it seal (no water bath needed like when canning anything else). Now it’s time to make some pancakes!!

Finished jars upside-down to seal.

Finished jars upside-down to seal.

Evaporator - 11

Cold Days and Sawmills

I guess I should have clarified the title a little better: Cold Days and Sawmills Don’t Mix. Like most of the country, we have been experiencing some cold, cold weather this winter. That mixed with some snow and I am a happy camper. Since moving to West Virginia year round I have often been heard complaining about the mild winters. It’s cold and snowy for a day, but then it melts and makes everything soggy. You can’t rock climb, you can’t ski, you can’t sled and, while you can still work outside, it’s just not that much fun in the mud that’s left in the wake of melted snow. That is where my husband and I are stuck right now. We still have some siding we need to cut up for our chicken coop we are going to build this spring, but the weather has not really been cooperating with us (when we get the sawmill running for that I will take some detailed photos and post about the whole process). The last set of logs my husband cut up when he had Christmas Eve off ended with a blanket of snow covering everything. It makes for pretty pictures, but numb extremities to say the least (although our dog was pretty happy…..even if she doesn’t look like it in the picture).

Christmas Eve lumber cutting in the snow.

Christmas Eve lumber cutting in the snow.

But enough with talking about how snow and sawmills don’t mix! Let’s talk about the sawmill. Yep, that’s right, we own a sawmill. If you would have asked me 5 years ago for a list of things that I would own in the future, I am pretty sure sawmill was not even close to being on the radar. The idea came when, like I talked about in the last post, we were cutting down trees over here and some more over there and a whole bunch in-between. While we burned the tops of the trees for lack of better things to do with them, and stacked the medium size pieces for firewood for our future house that wasn’t even close to having the ground broke on it, we were quickly being over-run with stacks of large, 20’+ long logs that we didn’t know what else to do with. We had talked about how cool it would be to have someone come in and mill up the wood for us to build a barn with, but what’s the fun in having someone else do all that work for you? Now this is the part where about 97.4% of you say “That sounds like a lot of fun to have someone else do that for you.” But then again that 97.4% probably also wouldn’t think that buying a large piece of vacant land and building it from the ground up sounds like fun either J And to be honest, I have those days too where I think the same thing, but then I look around at everything we have done so far, and how amazing it will look when we keep checking more and more off of our to-do list, and then I realize that I am being silly.

One of the many logs we cut up for lumber.

One of the many logs we cut up for lumber.

When we realized that the money we would spend by having someone come in and cut up the lumber for us would cover a large portion of purchasing the sawmill ourselves, it seemed like a no-brainer. Then we would have the mill on hand to be able to cut wood anytime for any project. Of course if you factor in the hours upon hours of cutting we did over the 2013 summer, I guess you could say that it’s not really that good of a price. But satisfaction in doing hard work is its own reward.

In the end we decided on a Wood Mizer LT15. According to the Wood Mizer website, “The LT15 is an overachiever in its class and has produced more than 2.5 times its published board foot per hour in several industry competitive events. The LT15 is a powerhouse that will take on any size project, dream, or lumber demand.” SOLD!! How can you argue with a description like that? “A powerhouse that will take on any size project, dream, or lumber demand”?? Yes please! And so far it has held up to its end of the bargain. Over the course of 5 months (April – August 2013) my husband and I spent most of our free time milling up wood and stacking wood. To say that it was a learning process is almost an understatement. After eventually figuring out how we could get the most rectangular objects (our lumber) out of a circular object (the log), we made the mistake of cutting lumber that we assumed we would need without having an actual barn plan, only to find out later that we probably didn’t need quite all of those dimension pieces at those lengths. But, like they say, practice makes perfect, right? We also ended up having to re-arrange a few of the stacks of cut lumber more than once. While we knew to use 1” X 1” wood stickers lain perpendicular to the boards between each layer to promote horizontal air movement, we failed to realize the importance of keeping all vertical columns of wood the same width as well. By not stacking 1” X 6” boards on top of 1” X 6” boards, for example, we initially prevented vertical air movement between all the wood. A number of them got a nasty black layer of mold on them which doesn’t harm their structural integrity, but looks pretty bad. It also didn’t help that the summer of 2013 was a very rainy summer increasing the amount of moisture that was unable to escape from our slowly drying lumber. But we learned; and in the process we sort of stopped rock climbing, and biking, and going for hikes, and playing disk golf, and you get the picture. All spare time was spent cutting wood. Get up, go to work, get off work, drive home, change and gather supplies (i.e. beer), drive to property (luckily only an 8 minute drive away), start cutting! I should probably point out that we were responsible with our supplies– all beer was consumer post sawmill use. It just always seemed like a good idea 🙂

Poplar log slowly turning into lumber.

Poplar log slowly turning into lumber.

And so continued the summer. Even our parents got put to work when they came to visit. The same with a large number of friends; and they all continue to love us and be our friends, so I guess it couldn’t have been that bad. In the end we had cut:

Dimension

Length

Number Cut

 

Dimension

Length

Number Cut

2” X 6”

9’

48

2” X 10”

9’

8

11’

10

17’

9

13’

16

2’ X 12”

9’

9

15’

17

17’

36

17’

9

1” X 3”

9’

44

2” X 8”

13’

6

15’

9

15’

39

1” X 10”

13’

100

16’

11

15’

20

1” X 6”

9’

109

Wood, wood and some more wood.

Wood, wood and some more wood.

We didn’t keep exact track of how many trees that was, but it was probably close to 12 poplar trees (for framing) and 2 red oak (for the 1” X 6” loft flooring). We planned a “Barn Raising” party during 2013 Columbus Day weekend. We figured that would be enough time for the wood to dry and that we would be able to entice a bunch of friends to visit and work for the long weekend. My husband and I had gotten married Columbus Day weekend the year before, so it was time for another big party (Goal for 2014: House Warming Party that same weekend – I see a trend). In total, we had about 18 friends from out of town, a handful of local friends and both of my parents come help for the long weekend. I am pretty sure that my dad was almost as excited about the barn building as my husband and I were; he is a mason in Western New York, which is about a 7 ½ hour drive – in a normal vehicle. He ended up coming down with his work truck. Now, when I say work truck, I don’t mean his day-to-day pickup truck. I mean his big honkin’, semi-truck cab, diesel sucking, flat-bed and trailer-towing truck. And it had 2 scissor lifts on it along with a whole array of other tools. I almost died laughing when I first saw him pull in our driveway with that thing. That’s why I love my dad; go big, or don’t bother coming at all. But, that will all have to wait for another post….

One of the 2 man lifts my dad brought for our barn raising.

One of the 2 man lifts my dad brought for our barn raising.

My dad's large truck he drove 7 1/2 hours loaded with equipment for our barn raising.

My dad’s large truck he drove 7 1/2 hours loaded with equipment for our barn raising.